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Keiha@ch
CATEGORY:@art history / sculptures
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A school of Buddhist sculptors *busshi t active from the late Heian period through the Edo period, founded by Jouchou 蒩 (?-1057; see *Jouchouyou 蒩l) successor Kakujo o. Kakujo set up a workshop *bussho in Kyoto's Shichijou *shichijou bussho 𕧏, and his son Raijo established a workshop in Koufukuji , Nara, which became the headquarters of the Keiha. In the early Kamakura period, Raijo was succeeded by Koukei Nc and Unkei ^c (?-1223), and the school became known as Keiha because of the frequent use of the character c kei in sculptors' names. The school was then passed on to Unkei's six sons and their descendants. The success of the Keiha began with major restoration work carried out in Koufukuji and Toudaiji 厛, both damaged by fire in 1180. This work was supported by the Kamakura government, who favored the Keiha because of their bold, powerful sculptural style, and also because they lacked close links with the Kyoto Imperial family, who supported the Kyoto schools *Enpa ~h and *Inpa @h. These factors helped the Keiha again a dominant position in Buddhist sculpture making in the Kamakura period. Its influence lasted until the Edo period. Examples of its work include: the central Senju Kannon zazou ω (1254) and ten of the standing Kannonzou ω in Rengeouin @؉@ (Sanjuusangendou O\Oԓ) Kyoto, made by Unkei's eldest son Tankei Xc (1173-1256); the Ryuutoukizou S (1215) in Koufukuji Kondou by Unkei's third son Kouben N; and the Taisan'ou R, Shirokuzou i^ and Shimyouzou i (1259) in Byakugouji |, Nara, by Tankei's successor Kouen N~. In the late 14c, the sculptor Keiha to form an independent guild called *tsubai bussho ֈ䕧.
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REFERENCES:
*nara busshi ޗǕt, *nanto busshi st
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