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hikaebashira@T
KEY WORD :@architecture / general terms
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Also called tsukkaibashira ˎx, hikaetori T, sasaebashira also read *shichuu x, and osaebashira , and very rarely tasukebashira .

1@The secondary pillars or posts placed in front and/ or behind the main pillars of gates to shore them up and stabilize them. The hikaebashira of four-legged gates *shikyakumon lr, are attached to the main pillars by penetrating horizontal members. The upper member is called *sarugashira . The base members are called hikaenuki T, ashimotonuki or sometimes simply *nuki . Such secondary pillars are also used to shore up wooden framed walls or fences, and are generally placed diagonally. The posts themselves may be positioned vertically parallel to the main pillars, but the upper tie *hinuki , is placed on the diagonal. All of the ties are secured by wedges *kusabi , on both sides of the posts.

Zuiganji Onarimon ގ䐬 (Miyagi)

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@When several posts made of unstripped cypress, cedar, chestnut or oak logs are used to support purlins visible beneath deep, overhanging eaves, they are called sasaebashira x. When the eaves are deep and resemble pent roofs, they are called *tsuchibisashi y or debisashi o. Log posts set bottom end down on round natural stone bases placed on the ground beyond the edge of the veranda are called sutebashira ̒, and are commonly used in *sukiya-zukuri 񉮑 or tea architecture *chashitsu . An archaic word for sutebashira is sukebashira . Examples: Sougenji Shikyakumon @lr (1237), Nara.
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