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sumiyoshi-zukuri@Zg
CATEGORY:@architecture / shrines
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A style of main sanctuary *honden {a, in Shinto shrine architecture. It is 4-bays wide and 2-bays deep. The interior is divided in the center into two rooms. The front room is called the*gejin Ow and the rear room is called the *naijin w. The building is characterized by a straight gable roof *kirizuma yane ؍ȉ, with deep over hanging eaves. Layers of cypress bark, hiwada O, form a thick roof covering. The only entrance is centered on the front gable end, *tsumairi ȓ. The peak of the roof has a box-like ridge with bird-perches *toribusuma , placed on top of a type of ogre tile, *oni-ita S, which finish the ends. Straight forked finials okichigi u (see *chigi ), placed on the box-like ridge are set at a steep angle. The five billets are evenly spaced and, like all these members, covered with copper sheeting. Gold medallions adorn the center of the ogre tiles, the billet ends, and the side of the box-like ridge. The structural framework, visible on the exterior walls, reveals the roof support system in the gable ends. A central strut *sasuzuka L, is strengthened by a diagonal brace called *sasusao L, or *inokosasu 泝L on each side. These in turn are supported by transverse gable end beams *tsumabari ȗ, which stretch across the building from corner pillar to corner pillar. Panel board *haneme-ita Hڔ, placed horizontally fill the exterior spaces between the pillars. The doors are plank itado Œ. A non-penetrating hip tie beam *koshinageshi , runs around the building level which has a relatively low floor. There are no verandas. About five steps lead up to the entrance. Two fences *mizugaki _ and *tamagaki ʊ_, reminiscent of the Ise style, closely surround the building on three sides. A broad shallow worship hall, *haiden qa, with an undulating gable *karahafu j, and a dormer bargeboard *chidori hafu 璹j, was added in the Edo period. This building and the short-roofed hall, watadono na, connecting the haiden with the honden are not part of the original Sumiyoshi style. A simple gate-like structure *torii , painted vermillion except for the black painted top lintel *kasagi }, and another elaborately painted gate, indicate the division between the haiden and the wataridono. The torii and gate, which were probably originally undecorated, suggest that before the Edo period, people worshipped in front of them. The interior plan is divided equally into two spaces, front and rear, called a *gejin Ow and a *naijin w respectively. Short walls extend from the pillars centered on each side and are attached to pillars with a smaller diameter. A wood door closes the space in between. Several obvious similarities exist between the buildings in the Sumiyoshi style and the Yuki-in shouden II@a and the Suki-in shouden @a situated in the front halves of the eastern and western precincts of the temporary Daijou palace *daijoukyuu 另{, constructed for The Great Food Offering Festival *daijousai 另. The close resemblances between the sumiyoshi style and the Daijou Palace suggest a palace lineage for the architectural style, one which allowed the gods and the emperor to dwell together under the same roof. Examples: Sumiyoshi Taisha Honden ZgЖ{a (1810) Osaka. Sumiyoshi Jinja Zg_, Fukuoka prefecture. Both are of these shrines reveal an old style, there is no veranda.
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