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sumiro@F
KEY WORD :@architecture / tea houses
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One of several arrangements for positioning the fire-box *ro F or fixed hearth in a small tea ceremony room *chashitsu . With the positioning called *hongatte {, sumiro is cut into the front left corner at the narrow end of the host's mat *temaedatami _O. In the reverse position *gyakugatte t, sumiro is cut into the front right corner at the narrow end. In the latter position the fire-box is also known as the *mukougiri type. According to the *NANBOUROKU ^, written by Nanbou Soukei @[ (?-1624?), Tachibana Souyuu ԏ@L stated that in consultation with Sen Rikyuu 痘x (1522-91), they devised a 2-mat room, nijouchashitsu . Rikyuu stated that a 42cm square fire-box could be made by measuring the distance from the *daisu q to the opposite corner and then cutting it there. CHADENSHUU `W (1847) by Soumu @ states that the corner firebox should be installed on the kitchen side, with a 5cm wide board inserted between it and the wall. Without the board it was difficult to grasp the handle of the water ladle *hishaku , and the wall might be damaged by the heat from the fire-box. Usually, at least a 4cm wide straight grained board is inserted between the wall and a fixed-hearth. During Sen Rikyuu's lifetime, the expressions migimuki E, meaning to face right and hidarimuki , to face left, were commonly used. Sumiro is a more recent usage. See *iriro F. Examples; Myouki'an Tai'an ҈, Kyoto and Kanden'an c, Shimane prefecture.
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*hachiro F
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