@
shouji-e@qG
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
@
Lit. paintings on screens *shouji q. Shoji-e is a term used before the 12-13c in reference to paintings on fusuma shouji q (see *fusuma ), sliding doors and screens, and *tsuitate shouji ՗q, free-standing single-paneled screens. Today the word *fusuma-e G is commonly used for shouji-e. Shouji (now called fusuma) were constructed of a light wooden frame covered with paper batting on to which paper or silk was pasted and decorated. Documents demonstrate that shouji were used as room dividers in *shinden-zukuri Qa residences of the nobility from at least the 8c. An early appearance of the term occurs in SAIDAIJI SHIZAI RUKICHOU 厛ޗL of 780, which refers to paintings on both tsuitate and fusuma shouji. Although there are no extant shouji-e examples from before 14c, there are a number of literary references to shouji-e in domestic buildings. Illustrated handscrolls *emaki G also include scenes of room interiors with shouji-e. Painted shouji screens were used in the Imperial Palace since 9c. For example, *Konmeichi-no-shouji rq was a type of standing screen seen in depictions in the illustrated scrolls of The Courtier Ban Dainagon, Ban Dainagon ekotoba [G (late 12c, Idemitsu o Museum of Art, Tokyo). After the 11c, the term shouji-e refers more often to paintings on sliding doors which had become more popular than free-standing screens. 15c panel paintings were almost exclusively executed on a paper (not silk). Some shouji-e were created with ink alone (see *kanga ), while the others employed extensive gold backgrounds and bright pigments rendering bold, and vigorous motifs.
@
@

@
REFERENCES:
*shouheiga ᛠ, *shohekiga lj, *byoubu-e G, *kinpeki shouhekiga ɏlj@
EXTERNAL LINKS: 
@@
NOTES
@

(C)2001 Japanese Architecture and Art Net Users System.@No reproduction or republication without written permission.
fڂ̃eLXgEʐ^ECXgȂǁASẴRec̖fE]ڂւ܂B
@