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shinden-zukuri teien@Qa뉀
KEY WORD :@architecture / gardens
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Lit. shinden style garden. The quintessential Heian period garden that was built in the central courtyard of aristocratic residences (see *shinden-zukuri Qa). Modeled on Chinese architecture of the Tang dynasty, the complex centers on the south-facing main hall or shinden which is flanked by subsidiary buildings that are attached by long corridors. A pond and island garden called *rinsen ѐ or *enchi r fills the space withing the U-shaped courtyard created by the architecture. Typical shinden style garden ponds are fed by an artificial stream *yarimizu from the northeast of the compound. This contains several islands nakajima reached by a carved bridge *soribashi , on the north side and a flat bridge *hirabashi on the south side. To the west of the pond is a fishing pavilion tsuridono ޓa, while on the south side is a spring pavilion izumidono a, both attached to the main structure by covered passageways watadono na. The pond, if large enough, would be navigated in dragon boats. The design of the areas of the pond was often meant to evoke famous aquatic scenery from China or Japan. The shinden style garden, originally the location of ceremonies, developed into a pleasure garden to be enjoyed on foot, by boat, or viewed from the pavilions. Although no such gardens survive from the Heian period, the 11c *SAKUTEIKI L (Treatise on Garden Making) describes the function and design of the gardens. Written descriptions also appear in Heian literature such as GENJI MONOGATARI (The Tale of Genji), while visual depictions of shinden gardens may be found in Heian and Kamakura period paintings as the Nenjuu Gyouji emaki NsG (Picture scroll of annual events ; Tokyo National Museum). Shinden style gardens were often converted to Pure Land garden *joudo teien y뉀 after the death of their owner. The best-known examples are the gardens, at Byoudouin *Hououdou @P in Kyoto and at Moutsuuji щz in Iwate prefecture. Other examples, such as those at Tenryuuji V and Rokuonji in Kyoto, were altered to accommodate the taste and function of new patrons in the Muromachi period.
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