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doushakuga@߉
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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Lit. Daoist Buddhist paintings. A genre of painting on Daoist (Taoist; Jp; Doukyou ) and Buddhist (shaku from *Shaka ߉) themes which came to Japan from China and is characterized by the use of simple brush strokes in black ink *sumi n with little or no color . If figures are included in the paintings, as in most examples, they are specifically called doushaku jinbutsuga ߐl. These works were not of a purely religious nature intended as objects of worship, but were appreciated for the aesthetic qualities of the painting itself. Popular subjects of doushakuga include: Buddhist saints such as *Daruma B; *Kannon ω, particularly the white-robed Kannon *Byakue Kannon ߊω; *Hotei z; *rakan , *Kanzan Jittoku RE and Daoist immortals *Gama Tekkai 寓S, *Ryo Douhin Co, *Kin Kou sennin Սl, and *Chou Karou ʘV. Doushakuga imported from China, especially of the Song and Yuan dynasties (see *sougenga v), were recorded in catalogues of art treasures compiled in the Muromachi period, and they served as an influence on Japanese painting. Doushakuga were started by Zen T (Ch: Ch'an) priests and those who associated with them. Minchou (1352-1431), a priest-painter of Toufukuji (Kyoto), was the first Japanese artist associated with this genre. Two Zen priest-painters who are considered to be Minchou's followers, Sekkyakushi ԋrq (fl. early 15c) and Reisai (fl.1430-50), also painted in their teacher's style. Doushakuga were often painted in black sumi ink without or with little color. Another priest-painter Kaou ‰ (fl. first half 14c) who favored Buddhist subjects is thought to have been a pioneer of Japanese ink painting *suibokuga n. Other priest painters of doushakuga in ink were Mokuan و (fl.1323-45), Tesshuu Tokusai SB (?-1366) and Bonpou F (ca.1348-1420). Doushakuga was a popular genre of ink painting even after the Muromachi period, and examples were produced by painters of various schools including *Kanouha h and *Rinpa Ԕh, *ukiyo-e G painters parodied Daoist and Buddhist figures.
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