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danjouzumi@d
KEY WORD :@architecture / general terms
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Also written d; danjouzumi kidan dϊd. A style of podium introduced to Japan from Korea in the latter half of the 6c along with tiled roofs, plastered walls and visible, painted structural members. Buddhism was also introduced at this time. No buildings are extant from this time but excavations in the Nara area reveal the use of stone bases for pillars, roof tiles, and structural method as well as the arrangement of buildings in the early 7c. Examples are Asukadera 򒹎 in Nara and Shitennouji lV in Osaka. The core was composed of mud, clay and rubble piled up in layers until the required height and size were reached. The sides were cut perpendicular to the ground and the top surface was leveled and smoothed. A shallow trench was dug around the base of the mound so that the long horizontal base stones *jifuku-ishi n which formed a continuous plinth course could be firmly imbedded. Next stone slabs or panels *hame-ishi Hڐ were placed closely against the sides of the core and ran continuously along the plinth cours. In addition, stone struts *tsuka-ishi were set at the corners and at intervals along each side. The width and spacing varied with the size of the podium. Curbstones *katsura-ishi crowned the topmost edge. Example: Toushoudaiji *Kondou 񎛋 (mid-8c) in Nara. All formal podii have steps usually centered on each side. Stones slanted to correspond with the slope of the steps are called *mimi-ishi . The surfaces of podii were covered with tiles sengawara ꊢ or stone slabs. If the stones were laid so that the lines formed by the adjoining stones alternate row by row, the style was called *nunoshiki z~. Where square tiles were placed on the diagonal, the style was referred to as shihanjiki l~. If covered with plaster, it was referred to as *shikkui . Podii constructed of cut stone only, are called kiri-ishizumi ؐΐ. Example: Houryuuji *Kondou @ (rebuilt 693) in Nara. Japanese podii were usually not high, but sometimes when height was desired, two levels were made. The first level is called tansei P. Other levels are called juusei d. Examples include the podium in Houryuuji Kondou and that built for the reconstruction of Shitennouji Gojuu-no-tou lV܏d in Osaka after World War 2. Railings were put around the edge of these podii. Railings around podii may also be seen at Houryuuji *Yumedono @a (739), and Yakushiji Kondou t (rebuilt in the 1970s) in Nara. Already in the late Heian period, Ichijouji *Sanjuu-no-tou 掛Od (1171) in Hyougo prefecture was built. Thus, began the trend away from the formal type of podii, danjouzumi, rarely built after the beginning of the early Kamakura period. Some podii remained in the Nara region after the wooden structures were burned during the wars between the Taira and Minamoto claus. Old style buildings were re-erected on such podii. Example: Koufukuji Toukondou (1415) in Nara.
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Koufukuji Hokuendou k~
Koufukuji Hokuendou k~ (Nara)

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REFERENCES:
*kidan d, *ranzumi , *kamebara T, *soseki b
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NOTES
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