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sangawarabuki@V
CATEGORY:@architecture / roofing tiles
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Also called jigawara n because it is a base tile; and kanryakugawara ȗ because it combines a broad concave tile *hiragawara and a semi-cylindrical convex tile *marugawara ۊ, into one tile. It is sometimes called kumodomegawara _~. A pantile. The tile is square but undulates from concave to convex. Because it combines two tiles *sangawara V is quicker to produce, lighter weight and easier to lay. In order to distinguish sangawarabuki from the traditional tile roofing composed of separate broad, concave tiles hiragawara, and semi-cylindrical convex tiles marugawara, the term *hongawarabuki { meaning formal tile roofing was invented. It is believed that Nishimura Gorobee ܘYq, (later called Hanbee q) first thought to combine the two tiles in 1674. They were originally used on temple roofs and later on residences and other types of buildings. Initially, the part replacing the marugawara, called the san V, was large and the concave part replacing the ordinary hiragawara, called the valley *tani J was deep. Gradually, they became uniform and the curves more gentle making them easier to use and to secure. In traditional architecture the sizes of tiles were referred to as shikuban l㔻 (about 49 tiles), gorokuban ܘZ (about 56 tiles), and rokushiban Zl (about 64 tiles). The numbers indicate how many tiles were needed to cover a 3.3 sq.m (one tsubo ). Using system, this a tile setter would know immediately how many tiles were needed to cover the entire roof. These tiles usually curve so that the rounded part san is on the right side when facing the tile, but there are cases where the san is reversed and placed on the left side. When they were used for eave-end tiles *nokigawara , the sangawarabuki's san and valley both usually have decorative pendants *gatou , circular on the end of the part corresponding to the marugawara and long, curved, concave shaped one corresponding to the hiragawara. Traditionally, arabesque patterns *karakusamon found on the broad concave eave-end tile were applied to the eave-end valley of pantiles, and a comma pattern *tomoemon b was most frequently used on pendant of the san. If the pendants are undecorated, the combined tile as called manjuu nokigawara \.
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Hongakuji {o (Kanagawa)

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