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hassou kangu@o
KEY WORD :@architecture / decorations
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Also called hassou kanamono o; sakawa kanagu t֋ or saba-no-o I̔. Lit. twin eights metalwork. A long, narrow decorative metal work fitting *kazarikanagu , that is bent around the hinged edge of a door leaf in such a way that the forked design appears on both sides of the door. Generally, the metalwork is gilt bronze and is nailed down top and bottom near the edges with about one third exposed on either side of the door. Aside from being decorative, it is practical. It strengthens the pivot hinge *jikuzuri and prevents separation from the door leaf. The name is derived from the identical forked design on each side of the door leaf (as sou o means 'both), and the forked part resembling the character hachi, meaning eight. Many hassou kanagu are decorated with embossed patterns on a thin metal sheet. From the Momoyama period and into the Edo period, some were made with brilliant relief patterns on thick metal plates. An example can be found on the plank doors *itakarado “, of the Guest Hall, Kyakuden qa at Daikakuji o, in Kyoto. In this case, the ends are not forked but protrude. Patterns with protruding ends in the shape of a flower are called dehassou oo. These are the standard types of decorative metal-work on doors. Prior to the Heian period dehassou were used exclusively and continued to be used even after the introduction of the popular hassou kanagu in the Kamakura period. The type of hassou kanagu that attached only around the front stiles and top and bottom rails of a door as pure ornamentation is called chirashihassou Uo. A hassou kanagu in a forked fish-tail inlet is called *irihassou o.
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*irihassou o : Houryuuji Toudaimon @ (Nara)


dehassou oo : Senshuuji Sanmon CR (Nara)
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