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Shuten douji@^q
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A pictorial subject taken from the popular tale, Ooeyama Shuten douji ]R^q (The Drunkard Boy of Mt. Ooe), also called Ooeyama onitaiji ]RSގ (The Subjugation of the Demon of Mt. Ooe). Handscrolls *emaki G of the theme are also known as Ooeyama ekotoba ]RG. The story tells how a famous warrior Minamoto no Raikou (also known as Yorimitsu, 948-1021) kills the giant ogre Shuten douji. The ogre, nearly 20 feet tall with flaming red hair, presided over a cannibalistic band of demons on Mt. Ooe in Tango O, northwest of Kyoto, from where they ravaged the countryside and abducted women from the capital. Raikou, specially chosen by the emperor, enlists five men to aid him and they prepare for their dangerous task by visiting the Shinto shrines of Iwashimizu Hachimanguu ΐ{ in Kyoto, Sumiyoshi Taisha Zg in Osaka, and Kumano Jinja F_ in Wakayama prefecture. The heroic band receive from the gods of the shrines three magical gifts: a wine to make Shuten douji drunk and impotent, a cord, and a golden helmet. Raikou and his men are guided to Shuten douji's grand mountain palace where they are served a feast of human flesh and blood by his beautiful captive maidens. In return, the men offer the demons the magic wine which puts Shuten douji into a sound sleep and rendering his minions helplessly drunk. Shuten douji is then bound with the cord, yet when Raikou slices off the demon's huge head it flies into the air and lands upon Raikou, who is saved by the magic helmet. The story ends happily with the release of the ladies and the return of peace and prosperity. The exact origins of the tale are unknown, but apparently it was popular by the later half of the 14c when the earliest extant illustrated handscroll of the theme in the Itsuou 퉥 Museum was produced. Another version of the story developed, this time set at Mt. Ibuki ɐ in Oumi ߍ] province, and emphasizing Shuten douji's debauched ancestry and his abandonment in childhood by his mother. This story was adapted into *nou \, joururi ڗ, and *kabuki ̕ repertories, and by the 18c was one of the 23 most popular illustrated *otogi zoushi 䉾. The story was often painted by Edo period artists who typically depicted the entire narrative in emaki or across a pair of folding screens *byoubu such as the one in Shin'enkan S Museum, Los Angels. *Kanouha h artists favored the Ibukiyama version, perhaps because school patriarch Kanou Motonobu 쌳M (1476-1559) painted it on a handscroll (The Suntory Tg[ Museum of Art, Tokyo). The theme was a favorite of the warrior caste, with a resulting visual emphasis on violent martial scenes. *Ukiyo-e G artists reworked the theme into farcical parodies, often substituting actors or beautiful women for the original characters.
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