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Shiokumi@
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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Lit. brinemaidens. Women who worked hauling brine to make salt. In Japanese art, Shiokumi often indicates the sisters *Matsukaze and Murasame J in particular. The SENJUSHOU W (early Kamakura period) tells of the 10c courtier Ariwara no Yukihira's ݌s (818-93) exile at Suma { where he fell in love with two brinemaidens. This story, along with several of Yukihira's poems from KOKINSHUU ÍW (nos. 962 & 355), form the basis of Kannami's ψ (1333-84) *nou \ play MATSUKAZE in which the ghosts of Matsukaze and Murasame wait at Suma beach for Yukihira's promised return, cherishing his outer cloak and cap left as keepsakes. The play was substantially transformed in Chikamatsu Monzaemon's ߏ卶q (1653-1724) joururi ڗ MATSUKAZE MURASAME SOKUTAI KAGAMI Jы of 1694. From the joururi several "dance pieces" shosagoto 쎖 developed in the early 18c which in turn led to the creation of several *kabuki ̕ plays in the mid and late 18c. Illustrations of generic Shiokumi are found largely in *meisho-e G screen paintings of Akashi and Suma. The noh play MATSUKAZE is illustrated in an 16c handscroll (Spencer col, N.Y. Public Library), while the shosagoto version is represented in a painting by Hanabusa Itchou p꒱ (1652-1724, Yabumoto col). The kabuki plays are pictured in several *ukiyo-e G prints, most notably a diptych by Tani Bunchou J (1763-1841) and Katsukawa Shunshou t (1726-93), while Suzuki Harunobu ؏tM (1724-70) developed two compositional types of Shiokumi *bijinga l that were widely imitated by Torii Kiyonaga (1752-1815), Utagawa Toyoharu ̐Lt (1735-1814) and many followers.
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