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misegura@X
KEY WORD :@architecture / storehouses
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A shop constructed using the fireproof system of construction known as *dozou-zukuri y or *kura-zukuri . The misegura is believed to have developed in Edo, probably in the years following the fire which destroyed the city in 1657. An early example, for which some records survive, was the Daikokuya 单 (1662). However, it was not until after the shogunate government began to encourage construction of storehouses kura in the Kyouho era (1716-35) that misegura became numerous. From Edo, the style spread to other towns of the Kantou ֓ region. Kawagoe z, Saitama prefecture, has one of the oldest surviving examples, the Oosawa House (1792), and also has a number of late 19c examples. Misegura not only dominated the streetscape of towns throughout the Kantou in the late 19c, but spread north as far as Hokkaidou, and even gained a foothold in the Kansai ֐ region (the earliest misegura in Osaka is said to have been erected in around 1850). Misegura were usually two story structures directly overlooking the street. Most had their entrance on the non-gabled side of the building (see *hirairi ). The shop was on the ground floor, which had a tiled veranda *hisashi , and often a storage pit, anagura , beneath. The entire shopfront could be closed with heavy fireproof plastered sliding shutters *tsuchido y. Fireproof plastered double-hinged swing doors *kannonbiraki tobira ωJ, opened the rear of the shop to the rest of the plot behind. The misegura could thus be sealed from front and rear in case of fire. The upper floor was used for storage, as accommodation for employees, or as a reception room *zashiki ~, for entertaining guests or customers. The upper floor facade had either plastered latticework *koushi iq, with fireproof sliding shutters or small windows closed with kannonbiraki tobira, usually placed symmetrically. For the eaves, a round eaves purlin * dashigeta o, and an inverted stepped profile, nokijabara ֕, were preferred to the thick plaster under the eaves *hachimaki , found in the conventional mud-wall storehouses. A white plaster finish was common in the 18c but in Kantou black plaster became the dominant fashion by the latter half of the 19c. The roof was usually gabled *kirizuma yane ؍ȉ and tiled with pan tiles *sangawara V. The built-up box ridge *hakomune , with large goblin-mask tiles *onigawara S and oversized scroll-like plaster decoration *kagemori e, were very prominent features, especially in later examples. Misegura were an expensive symbol of a merchant's wealth.
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Hara  house in Kawagoe z (Saitama)
Hara  house in Kawagoe z (Saitama)
a) *kagemori e@b) *hakomune @c) *dashibari o
d) nokijabara ֕@e) *kannonbiraki tobira ωJ@f) menuridai ړh

Hara house in Kawagoe z (Saitama)

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*mise X@
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