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minoyaki@Z
KEY WORD :@art history / crafts
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Mino Z ware. A general name for ceramic wares made in the town of Tajimi in old Mino province (now the south-eastern part of Gifu prefecture). Sueki {b ware from the 7c has been discovered in the area, but Mino was mentioned by name in 905 as a place for fine ash-glazed stoneware. During the Kamakura and Muromachi periods the use of the potter's wheel and a greater variety of glazes created more sophisticated pottery in Chinese-derived styles. During the Momoyama period, when the tea ceremony stimulated the production of tea wares, many Seto potters migrated from Owari province (Aichi prefecture) to Mino to take advantage of its abundant clay and fuel as well as the patronage of Oda Nobunaga DcM (1534-82 ), leading to the development of distinctive stonewares there. Glazed teabowls, based on Chinese prototypes but adopting Japanese aesthetics,were produced in great numbers. In the late Momoyama period, the Mino potter Katou Kagenobu i reportedly brought the secrets for producing *karatsuyaki Ï to the Mino kilns, and from the 15c Mino kilns produced Karatsu style wares. The *noborigama oq (climbing kiln) was introduced from Karatsu. At the same time, Mino kilns also made vessels in the style of *igayaki ɉ. Mino wares include a range of *shinoyaki u and *setoyaki ˏ types, *oribeyaki D, seiji Ž (celadon), and ofukeyaki [ made from sensoutsuchi (iron-rich clay) and covered with a wood-ash glaze that turns a transparent pale yellow when fired. White-glazed stonewares first satisfied the demand for Chinese underglaze-decorated porcelain. Porcelain was produced in Mino from the end of the 19c. The excavation of Mino ceramics from daimyou 喼 residences throughout Japan testifies to their popularity.
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