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kenninjigaki@m_
KEY WORD :@architecture / gardens
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A type of bamboo fence that takes its name from its use first at the temple Kenninji m in Kyoto. It is also considered to be structural standard for erecting bamboo fences.
Tradition has it that the fence was originally made from discarded flat, thin, tall wooden grave tablets touba k. It is also thought that it was made from bamboo in groves in or near the temple precinct. However, these are unproven conjectures. This fence is believed to have been constructed only on the south side of the temple ground where the imperial messengers' gate *chokushimon g was located. During the Edo period and after, this type of fence was popular.
Construction depends on the placement of posts at given intervals and stay posts *hikaebashira T are erected in each section. These may be bamboos or logs. Four or five whole bamboo furring strips *oshibuchi are connected horizontally to the posts. Then split bamboo about 3cm wide are set vertically with no open space between them. These are tied to the furring strips with coarse brown or black palm rope. Horizontal split bamboo strips or battens further secure the vertical ones. The furring strips are on the exterior side. The formal type of fence shin-no-kenninnjigaki ^̌m_ has a bamboo copying for protection from rain by providing drainage. If no copying is used and the tops of the bamboos are cut off evenly, it is a semi-formal style called gyou-no-kenninjigaki šm_; if the lengths of bamboo differ resulting in irregularity along the top between posts, it is an informal type called sou-no-kennijigaki ̌m_. A type of kenninjigaki called oyakogaki eq_ has alternately wide and narrow vertical mullions.
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Nijoujou (Kyoto)

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REFERENCES:
*takegaki |_
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