@
Shinran@ea
KEY WORD :@art history / iconography
@
An abbreviation of Shinran Shounin eal (1173-1262), the founder of the New Pure Land sect, Joudo shinshuu y^@ of Buddhism. Beginning his studies in the Tendai V tradition on Mt. Hiei b, Shinran became *Hounen's @R disciple in 1201. Honen taught that through the simple act of faith and practice of the nenbutsu O (a formulaic chant 'All praise to *Amida '), anyone, however low in status or great in sin, would be reborn in Amida's Joudo Paradise. This message proved strong competition to the established, older Buddhist sects, which attempted to suppress it. In the nenbutsu persecution of 1264, Shinran was exiled to Echigo z (now Niigata prefecture) where he broke with the old tradition of clerical celibacy and married. In 1211 he moved to Hitachi 헤 (now Ibaraki prefecture) where he attracted a large following, before returning to Kyoto in 1234. In his principal theoretical work, the KYOUGYOUSHINSHOU sM (Teaching, Practice, Faith, Enlightenment ; 1214), Shinran posits that pure faith is impossible, but that man is saved by the gift of Amida's original vow hongan {, and thus recitation of the nenbutsu is only an expression of gratitude not a prerequisite to salvation. Shinran's fame and growing organization of followers led to the production of portraits both during his life and after his death. The famous standing portrait at Nishihonganji {莛, Kyoto, is said to have been painted in the last year of Shinran's life, and is called the Mirror Portrait Kagami-no-goei e. Rendered in bold ink lines, it captures Shinran's spiritual strength. More traditional seated images include the Anjou Portrait Anjou-no-goei e, attributed to priest Chouen ~ now at Nishihonganji, and its close copy the Kumakawa Portrait Kumakawa-no-goei Fe (14c; Nara National Museum), in which Shinran is depicted seated on a bearskin rug. Although Shinran's pose is similar to that used for portraits of Hounen, Shinran is easily distinguishable by his thin, severe face, and his white muffler and cane placed on the floor. The earliest illustrated narrative scroll of Shinran's biography was edited by his grandson Kakunyo o@ (1270-1351) in 1295. There are several variant narrative scrolls: the Nishihonganji version Zenshin shounin-e PMlG, the Senjuji C version in Mie prefecture Zenshin Shouin Shinran den-e PMlea`G, and the Higashihonganji {莛 version Honganji Shounin Shinran den-e {莛lea`G of 1346.
@
@

@
REFERENCES:
@
EXTERNAL LINKS: 
@@
NOTES
@

(C)2001 Japanese Architecture and Art Net Users System.@No reproduction or republication without written permission.
fڂ̃eLXgEʐ^ECXgȂǁASẴRec̖fE]ڂւ܂B
@