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shinkei-zu@^i}
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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Lit. true view pictures. A type of landscape painting based on naturalistic depiction of a particular place. The term dates from the mid Edo period (18c) when this type of landscape was developed by *nanga painters. The most famous is the True View of Mt. Asama Asamadake shinkei-zu FԐ^i} by Ike no Taiga r (1723-76). Taiga's friend Kuwayama Gyokushuu KRʏF (1746-99) discusses the theory behind shinkei-zu in his KAIJI HIGEN G翌 (Humble Words on Painting). True view pictures, also appear in Western-style painting *youfuuga m and most notably in the work of Aoudou Denzen cP (1748-1822), as in for example the screens of the True View of Mt. Asama Asamayama shinkei-zu ԎR^i} in the Tokyo National Museum. Although the term is Japanese, the idea of painting real places in a relatively life-like manner has a long history in Chinese painting, dating at least from the Song painter Li Song's (Jp: Ri Suu , late 12c-early 13c's) depiction of the West Lake at Hangzhou *Seiko and best seen in the work of the late Ming dynasty painter Zhang Hong (Jp: Chou Kou G, 1577-1668?). In Japan, Sesshuu's M (1420-1506) descriptive paintings of Ama no hashidate-zu V} and Toufukuji (both in the Kyoto National Museum) are depictions of famous places *meisho-e G, that show many characteristics of what was later called shinkei-zu. Conversely, Edo artists sometimes called their landscapes shinkei-zu although the depictions can hardly be called naturalistic renderings of recognizable spots. The term shinkei-zu is loosely defined and often arbitrarily applied.
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