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sasugumi@Lg
KEY WORD :@architecture / general terms
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1@Diagonal braces *sasuzao L, set on transverse beams *hari ; *kouryou . Some are strengthened by a central strut *sasuzuka L, and also added to support the ridge *mune . Diagonal braces form attractive patterns in the gable *tsuma , ends of temple and shrine buildings. They appeared in Buddhist temple buildings in the late 7c, and continued in *wayou al style buildings until after the 13c even though new styles of bracket systems and roof framing were introduced to take the form of the daibutsu style *daibutsuyou 啧l, and Zen style *zenshuuyou T@l, at that time. Examples: Shin'yakushiji Hondou Vt{ (8c) Nara. Open to the roof *keshou yaneura ω, these interior sasugumi have no center strut except in the gable ends. Sumiyoshi Taisha Honden ZgЖ{a (1812) Osaka.

2@Also referred to as sasu kouzou L\. An important form of thatched roof assembly in vernacular houses of the Edo period. The other is *taruki kouzou ؍\. The system employs upper crutch-like members called *sasu L, from which it derives its name. The feet of the sasu rest upon the principal transverse beam *jouyabari ㉮ or *koyabari , and the ridge purlin *munagi , is cradled at the point where they intersect at the top. Further support may be provided by a central row of struts sasuzuka, underpinning the sasu and ties *nuki , may be inserted as bracing members, both along and across the roof. A Sasugumi is a double rafter roof construction system. Horizontal members yanaka , often made of bamboo take |, are bound to the sasu at regular intervals and the rafters *taruki , also often made of bamboo, are tied to these. The rafters support the roof membrane of thatch. The *kyourogumi Cg assembly system with the beam uppermost and plate beneath, is particularly suitable for sasugumi. The sasu are usually spaced regularly at about 1 bay *ken , intervals, though closer spacing is not uncommon in areas where there is heavy snow in winter. Sasugumi was employed for all the major roof forms and was the most common form of roof structure for thatched Edo period vernacular dwellings *minka . The taruki kouzou rafter system, chiefly found in Kansai ֐ region, employed a ridge strut *udatsu K to support the ridge purlin directly. In many regions, the professional carpenter's work finished at the level of the beams, and the erection and thatching of the roof was the responsibility of the householder. The simplicity of the sasugumi system made it ideally suited to erection by non-professionals.
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REFERENCES:
*gasshou , *gasshou-zukuri , *inokosasu 泝L, *kouryou sasugumi Lg
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