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ootsu-e@ÊG
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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Also known as oiwake-e ǕG, derived from place names on the outskirts of Ootsu. Small paintings produced for travelers and pilgrims to Miidera O䎛 by artists in Ootsu , the well frequented post town on the Toukaidou C, at the tip of Lake Biwa i in Oumi ߍ] province (present-day Shiga prefecture), not far from Kyoto. The works are unsigned and undated. Documentary evidence suggests they began to be sold from the Kan'ei i era (1624-44). Travel guide books such as FUURYUU TABINIKKI L (published 1684-88) suggest that early characteristic ootsu-e subjects depicted Buddhist themes that included *tenjin V_, Amida raigou-zu ɗ}} and the Blue-faced Deity Shoumen Kongou –ʋ. By around the 1860's images of popular story characters or humorous figures were widely sold including Gongorou ܘY and the arrow Ya-no-ne gorou ̍ܘY.
Demon Impersonating a Nenbutsu Reciter Oni-no-nenbutsu SO, Catfish and Gourd Hyoutannamazu Z\, Retainer Carrying Pike in Daimyou Processions Yakko yarimochi z and Dancing Girl with Wisteria Fujimusume are among the subjects of ootsu-e. By the 1700's popular rather than religious subjects including the above as well as *kabuki ̕ actors came to predominate.
Although often possessed of great charm and the verve of rapidly brushed *sumi n outlines (and from the late Edo period sometimes poetic inscriptions) with bright splashes of unmodulated mineral pigments (orange, green, yellow), stock images were increasingly repeated in great numbers and are extant today in nearly identical versions. Often used as protective amulets gofu 아 pasted up, for example, in kitchens and farm buildings. Popular throughout the country, *ukiyo-e G artists in Edo, such as Utagawa Kunisada ̐썑 (1786-1865) and Kuniyoshi F (1797-1861) in the early 19c, incorporated the distinctive designs into several woodblock print series. This may account for the legendary accounts which link the origins of the type to Iwasa Matabee ⍲q (1578-1650) and early ukiyo-e. Continued to be produced through the Meiji period.
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