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nakabashira@
KEY WORD :@architecture / tea houses, folk dwellings
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1@Also *daimebashira ڒ. A small pillar which stands at the front edge of the host's mat *temaedatami _O, at the corner of the hearth *ro F, in a tea ceremony room *chashitsu . Found in the arrangement known as *daimegiri ڐ or *mukougiri . The pillar is wooden, often of red pine akamatsu ԏ, chinquapin shii , cedar sugi , bamboo take |, cherry sakura or camellia tsubaki . On some pillars the bark is retained, whilst others are worked with an adze to give variety to the surface. A crooked piece of wood is usually chosen, often bent in a bow shape. The nakabashira is therefore also known as the curved pillar *magaribashira Ȓ or crooked pillar *yugamibashira c. At about the point where the post curves, about 60cm from the bottom, a stalk of bamboo or wood is inserted, and the area above this is enclosed to form a side wall *sodekabe . The lower part remains open. A so-called a bag hanging nail *fukurokakekugi ܊|B, is hammered into the nakabashira and a hanging shelf *tsuridana ޒI, is hung on this nail, facing the host's mat. The invention of the nakabashira is attributed to Sen Rikyuu 痘x (1522-91). A good example can be seen in the Houan H, Myoushinji Tenkyuuin SV@ (1856), Kyoto.

2@Another name for the main pillar *daikokubashira 单, in vernacular dwellings *minka , on the Oga j peninsular in Akita prefecture.

3@The inner pillars of a building as opposed to the outer pillars, sotogawabashira O, that are placed on the perimeter of a structure.
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