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meisho-zue@}
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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Illustrated topographies of famous places within a defined geographical region, published from the mid-to-late Edo period. Meisho-zue included information on the history of shrines and temples as well as on the special products of an area. Meisho-zue developed from *meishoki L, but included more numerous and more detailed pictures. Popular illustrated handbooks of famous places produced in the early Edo period are now called kohan-chishi ÔŒn (old editions of topography). The first example, Miyako meisho-zue s} (Illustrated Topography of the Capital), edited by haiku o poet Akizato Ritou Hߓ and illustrated by Takehara Shunchousai |t (fl. 1772-1801), was published by Yoshinoya Tamehachi g쉮ה in Kyoto in 1780. Meisho-zue eventually came to focus more on illustrations than text and included drawings using the bird's-eye viewpoint *choukan zuhou Ր}@. The text had many connections to poetry, and for that reason was well received by the public. Yoshinoya, with the same writer and artist mentioned above, published the supplements, Shuui miyako meisho-zue Es} and Miyako rinsen meisho-zue sѐ򖼏}. After the great success of these publications, many books with the name zue } were produced. These included: Toukaidou meisho-zue C} (illustrating the Toukaidou highway between Kyoto and Edo), the Kisoji meisho-zue ؑ\H} (illustrating the Kiso highway in modern Nagano prefecture), the Ise sanguu meisho-zue ɐQ{} (illustrating Ise Shrine), the Konpira sankei meisho-zue Qw} (illustrating Konpira Shrine), as well as the Toudo meisho-zue y} (illustrating famous locations in China). There were even works in this genre which were not topographies, such as the Sankai meisan-zue RCY} (picture book of speciality products). Meisho-zue continued to be published in the Kyoto and Osaka area until the Bunsei era (1804-30), and extended beyond the area in popularity. The first meisho-zue in Edo was the seven-volume Edo meisho-zue ]˖}, published between 1833-36. It was compiled by three generations of the Saitou ֓ family, from Choushuu H to his grandson Gesshin (1804-78). Hasegawa Settan JU (1778-1843) created the illustrations. The meisho-zue of Edo were mostly done by wood-block print *ukiyo-e G artists, and they greatly influenced the production of scenic view prints fuukei hanga iʼn, especially by Utagawa Hiroshige ̐Ld (1797-1858) and Katsushika Hokusai k (1760-1849).
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