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machiai@ҍ
KEY WORD :@architecture / tea houses
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Also machiaishitsu ҍ.

1@A waiting and resting shelter. Typically a rustic structure with a pent roof, three walls and an open front where guests rest while waiting their turn to be called to the tea house *chashitsu to participate in a tea ceremony. It is also used to relax during intervals between tea ceremonies. There may be a bamboo latticed window in one wall and a sand toilet *sunasetchin B, nearby. If the shelter is located in the outer garden sotoroji OIn, it may be called sotomachiai Oҍ, hakamatsuke ѕt or *yoritsuki t. If it is located in the inner garden *uchiroji In, it may be called a *koshikake machiai |ҍ, uchimachiai ҍ, or nakadachi koshikake |. Occasionally the waiting place in the inner garden is called koshikake and the one in the outer garden, machiai. Some machiai are square, doukoshikake |, but the usual type is the manekiyane style in which one side of the roof is shorter than the other. When the tea room is made of thatched straw kaya , the roof of the machiai is often tiled. The front is open and a bench is provided for the waiting guests. The bench often has a straw mat kure-ita , and wooden planks placed lengthwise on the bench. Bamboo blinds are hung to indicate the positions of the honored guest, companions, and lowest ranking participants called the last guard. A stepping stone *fumi-ishi , is placed in front of the bench, and a large stone called kinin zaseki Ml is also utilized as a trump stone *yaku-ishi . Often the side wall facing the inner tea garden has a latticed window *shitajimado n, to allow the guests to view the garden. The walls usually have paper *minatogami , pasted on the lower portions. Although most machiai are independent structures within the tea garden, several are part of other buildings. For instance: among sub-temples at Daitokuji 哿, the machiai of the Teigyokuken ʌ at Shinjuan ^ is part of the hallway of the *shoin @; the machiai at Mittan-no-seki of the Ryuukouin @ is attached to the side of the main hall, and the machiai of the Kan'in-no-seki ։B at Jukouin ڌ@ is built on the outside of the tea room itself. Although these machiai are really no more than covered benches, most independent machiai are quite small, often no more than one and a half *tatami size. A few, however, such as the machiai at Katsurarikyuu j{, are large, more like pavilions than small shelters.

2@An abbreviation for machiai jaya ҍ. An Edo period establishment euphemistically known as a teahouse, chaya , where guests were provided with refreshments and entertainment while waiting for performances or intimate assignations.
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