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kyoto busshi @st
KEY WORD :@art history / sculptures
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Also kyoubusshi t. Buddhist sculptors *busshi t associated with workshops *bussho in Kyoto, active from the 11-14c. The term is used in contrast to Nara sculptors *nara busshi ޗǕt and *nanto busshi st. The most important kyoto busshi consisted of two sculpture schools called *Enpa ~h and *Inpa @h. They were independently run (not government-managed), and produced statues commissioned by the Imperial court, nobility, and Buddhist temples. The En-pa, who often used the character 'En' ~ in their names, are thought to be descended from Jouchou's 蒩 (?-1057) pupil Chousei (1010-91). Their workshop was known as *sanjou bussho O𕧏 because of its location in Kyoto's Sanjou O district. The Inpa, said to have been founded by Jouchou's pupil Kakujo o (?-1077), often used the character 'In' @ in sculptors' names. Inpa had workshops in Kyoto's Shichijou-Oomiya *shichijou oomiya bussho 𕧏 and Rokujou madenokouji *rokujou madenokouji bussho Z𖜗H. In the late Heian period, kyoto busshi held a dominant position in Japanese Buddhist statuary, producing large numbers of figures in a gentle style based on Jouchou's *Jouchouyou 蒩l. Good examples include: Nikkou Gakkou Bosatsuzou F (1064) by Enpa sculptor Chousei in Kouryuuji L, and the Amida Nyoraizazou ɔ@ (1130) in Houkongouin @@, believed to be by Inkaku @o, both in Kyoto. In the early Kamakura period, some critics felt that kyoto busshi statues had become staid, and other schools such as *Keiha ch, supported by the Kamakura government, became dominant.
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