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kouro@F
KEY WORD :@art history / crafts
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Incense burner. Common materials are metal, pottery, horn, and lapis lazuli as well as various gems and woods. There are a variety of basic styles based on function, most serving in a Buddhist context. Suekouro F (placed incense burner), set on a table, include: hakuzanro RF made of bronze or pottery and popular in Tang China; hoya kouro ΎɍF (building shaped), one of the Esoteric Buddhist ritual implements; rengegata kouro @،`F (lotus shaped); kiriku kouro F (Sk; hrih); takoashi kouro F (octopus legs), with long and short legs, mainly used at Zen T temples; and kanaegata kouro C`F (tripod shaped). Egouro F (handled incense burners), featuring a funnel form burner with handle and stand, are held in the hand. Tsurikouro ލF (hanging incense burners), hung near an alcove, have rings for hanging. Zouro ۘF (elephant shaped incense burners), used for the Esoteric Buddhist kanjou ceremony, were stepped over by initiates to receive ablution. Kunro OF (fragrance incense burners) were used for perfuming clothes. Kikigouro F (smelling incense burners) were used for koudou (the incense-smelling game).
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