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Korobase@Ĕ
KEY WORD :@art history / sculptures
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Lit. Eight Hermits of Mt. Konron. Also read Konron Hassen. Alternative name: Tsurumai ߕ (Crane Dance). Masks representing cranes with a crown used in the bugaku y dance Hassen (Eight Hermits), a quiet dance hiramai of the Right u-no-mai E introduced from Korea komagaku y, and performed by four dancers (for classification terms see *bugaku y). The dance derives from two Chinese legends. In one, eight Chinese recluses living on Mt. Konron come down into the city, and in the other, cranes dance on the beach to the sound of a Chinese zither (Ch; qin ). In bugaku, four bird-like figures dance, their calls represented by the jingling of small bells hanging from the beaks of the masks. The climax occurs when the dancers join hands and sweep around in a circle, evoking with the dark blue sleeves of their robes the take off and flight of the cranes. A representation of this scene appears in the famous screens of 'Bugaku' by Tawaraya Soutasu U@B (act. early 17c; Daigoji 펛, Kyoto) and in similarly entitled screens by Tosa Touou y. Korobase masks are found in both deep and shallow styles of carving. All the earlier masks, like the ones dated 1042 and originally belonging to Toudaiji 厛, as well as the restored mask at Astuta Jinguu Mc_{ (dated 1178) in Aichi prefecture, are deeply carved and very three-dimensional, with large beaks and goggle eyes. In contrast, the Korobase by the buddhist sculptor *busshi t Inshou (dated 1185) at Kasuga Taisha t in Nara, appears flat, the beak and eyes suggested in shallow relief and the expressive element relegated to the patterning of incised wrinkles. The popularity of Inshou's piece is suggested by copies of this shallower type dating from the 14c to 17c.
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REFERENCES:
*bugakumen yʁ@
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