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kinki shoga@Պ
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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The four accomplishments celebrated by the Chinese scholar-literati elite as elegant pastimes : playing the qin (Jp; kin ); playing Chinese chess or qi (Jp: ki ); practicing calligraphy (Ch: shu, Jp: sho ); and painting (Ch :hua, Jp: ga ). They probably arrived in Japan in the 14c and, as a painting subject, were extremely popular. The painting by the Yuan period artist Ren Renfa (Jp: Nin Jinpatsu Cm) now in the Tokyo National Museum, probably typifies Chinese paintings of kinki shoga first known to Japanese. The earliest Japanese depiction is unknown, but according to the ZOKUSUI SHISHUU W, Kousei Ryouha ]h (1374-1446) inscribed a poem about kinki shoga on a painted fan. Among Muromachi period paintings, a pair of screens in the Ryoukouin @ and another attributed to Sesshuu M (1420-1506) are well known. Large numbers of works exist from later times, including notable examples by *Kanouha h painters Kanou Motonobu 쌳M (1543, Reiun-in _@), Kanou Eitoku i (1556, Jukouin ڌ@), and Kanou Tan'yuu TH (Nagoyajou É), as well as by Kaihou Yuushou CkF (1599, Kenninji m; etc.). Yuushou's many paintings of the theme sometimes feature Chinese court beauties accompanying the scholars or engaging in the four accomplishments themselves. As with many other Chinese themes in Japanese painting, the original values attached to kinki shoga paintings gradually diminished in this case to a generalized image of the scholar in nature. *Ukiyo-e G artists created parodies *mitate-e G of kinki shoga, typically with stylish courtesans in the place of Chinese scholars.
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