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keshou yane@ω
KEY WORD :@architecture / general terms
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Also called *keshou yaneura ω. The underside of a timber roof, commonly called an open ceiling or open-beamed ceiling, whereby the sheathing beams and rafters are visible and have been planed *keshou-ita ϔ. In the early centuries, open-beamed ceilings were painted red. Example: Shin'yakushiji Hondou Vt{ (8c), Nara. If a double roof system, with a hidden roof *noyane 쉮, and ceiling *tenjou V, is used, the ceiling may follow a similar structural system with sheathing and a second set of rafters that are visible. This ceiling, although following the general characteristics of the hidden roof structure, is set considerably lower and has a more gentle pitch. It is believed that installed ceilings or hidden roofs were not used until late in the 10c. When a hidden roof was placed only over the aisles *hisashi , in the large reconstructed lecture hall *Daikoudou u (990) at Houryuuji @. A building in the pure daibutsu style *daibutsuyou 啧l, does not have an installed ceiling or a hidden roof. Example: Joudoji *Joudodou yy (1193), Hyougo prefecture. After the 10c, ceilings were often installed in temple buildings, but the worship hall *gejin Ow, or the aisles *hisashi and *mokoshi ֊K, surrounding the core of a temple building were very often 1-bay deep and left open to the ceiling. In the case of pent roofs, the open-beamed ceiling is only the extension of the roof. Example: Joudoji Hachiman Jinja Haiden y_Дqa (14c), Hyougo prefecture, which has open-beams shaped like the underside of a hipped roof *yosemune yane 񓏉; Daizenji Hondou P{ (1286), Yamanashi prefecture.
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*keshou yaneura ω
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