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Hie Sannou matsuri@gR
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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Also known as Hie g (can be read Hiyoshi) matsuri or Sannou matsuri R. A pictorial subject depicting the festival of Hie Taisha g (known as Sannou Gongen R tutelary god of Enryakuji  in Shiga prefecture), at the foot of Mt. Hiei b. The festival is held annually at the shrine after the Day of the Monkey saru \ in the Fourth month. As popular as the *Gionmatsuri _, the Hie Sannou matsuri started in 1072, and was attended by worshippers ranging from courtiers to poor commoners. The festival was cancelled after Oda Nobunaga's DcM (1534-82) attack and torching of Mt. Hiei in 1571, but was revived in 1591. Various scenes of the festival are typically depicted on screens, which were probably used as souvenirs or as records for those who could not attend. The oldest extant example is a pair of four-panel screens *fusuma at Dannouhourinji h@ю in Kyoto, executed by a Kanou school *Kanouha h artist around 1600. The right screen (from the viewer's vantage point) shows the inner precincts of Hie Taisha, with a ritual procession bearing a sakaki tree. The left screen shows the climax of the festival, a race where the bearers of the portable shrines *mikoshi ` of the seven upper shrines fight to load their shrine first aboard boats to cross Lake Biwa i to Karasaki . A slightly later pair of screens at Konchi-in n@ in Kyoto, focuses entirely on the water-borne aspect of the festival. Screens in the Suntory Museum of Art and Nishimura Collection, pair the Hie Sannou matsuri with Gionmatsuri and Kamigamo horse race *Kamo no keiba ΋n, respectively.
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