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Hasegawaha@Jh
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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A school of painters active in the 16c and the 17c, founded by Hasegawa Touhaku J쓙 (1539-1610) who is thought to have come from the province of Noto \o, Ishikawa prefecture. Many aspects of Touhaku's life and oeuvre remain unclear. It has been postulated that early in his career he used the name Nobuharu Mt (also read Shinshun) and studied with Soga Joushou ]Џ (dates unknown) of Echizen zO (now Fukui prefecture). The name Hasegawa Nobuharu is inscribed on several paintings including depictions of Buddhist figures, portraits, and flowers and birds. These works exhibit a more delicate touch than the paintings bearing the signature or seals of Hasegawa Touhaku . According to records, Touhaku also studied for a period with the Kanou school *Kanouha h, perhaps in Kyoto; however, soon he turned away from the Kanou style and favored instead the tradition of Sesshuu Touyou Mk (1420-1506), the renowned ink painter *suibokuga n, of the late Muromachi period. It may be that Touhaku studied with Toushun t (active ca. 1506-42), a pupil of Sesshuu. Touhaku claimed to be a fifth generation descendent of Sesshuu, but he may have invented this claim as a means to attract patrons away from the rival Kanou painters, the preeminent school of his day. Assisted by influential acquaintances, such as the tea master and aesthete Sen Rikyuu 痘x (1522-91), Touhaku was able to secure a number of major commissions. As a mature artist, Touhaku worked extensively for Zen temples in Kyoto, emulating in particular the art of Muqi (Jp: Mokkei q: later 13c, see *sougenga v). Despite his close ties with members of the Zen sect, Touhaku followed the teachings of *Nichiren @. Nittsuu , a priest of the Nichiren sect living at Honpouji {@ of Kyoto, was responsible for recording Touhaku's comments on painting in the *TOUHAKU GASETSU . In his later years, Touhaku created masterpieces in suggestive, lyrical monochrome, as well as works of a more colorful and bold nature, such as the screen paintings of Maple Tree and Autumn Plants Kaede akikusa-zu H} ; (around 1592) in the Chishakuin qω@, Kyoto. In this work, Touhaku may have been assisted by his atelier, which is said to have included four sons who took the name Hasegawa and many followers. The most accomplished painter among Touhaku's sons was apparently the eldest, Kyuuzou v (1568-93), who is credited with the screen painting Cherry Trees Sakura-zu } in the Chishakuin. Touhaku's second son may have been Soutaku @ (? -1611), who supposedly received the title of hokkyou @. Sakon , perhaps his third son, adopted Touhaku's reverence for Sesshuu, referring to himself as the sixth generation descendent of Sesshuu. Souya @ (1590-1667), who may have been Touhaku's fourth son is known to have executed a number of works, including a depiction of The Willow Bridge and Water Wheel Ryuukyou suisha-zu Ԑ}. The style of late members of the Hasegawa School becomes increasingly close to the Kanou school style, and by the 17c the Hasegawa school largely fades into obscurity.
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