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Hakkenden@`
KEY WORD :@art history / paintings
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Lit. biographies of eight dogs. A pictorial subject in *ukiyo-e G taken from the NANSOU SATOMI HAKKENDEN 쑍`, Takizawa Bakin's n (1767-1849) woodblock-printed novels *yomihon ǖ{, published in 106 volumes between 1814-41. Samurai ideals of duty, family loyalty, righteousness, physical prowess and courage are central themes in an involved plot based on the structure of the Chinese novel Shuihuzhuan (Jp: SUIKODEN `). General Satomi Yoshizane ` offers his daughter Fusehime P to whomever kills his chief enemy. When his dog Yatsufusa [, kills the man, and returns with the head, Fusehime accepts the dog as her husband despite her father's objections. Eventually a child is born. A retainer of Yoshizane attempts to kill Yatsufusa, but his bullet strikes Fusehime who then stabs herself to death. Eight beads, each with a Chinese character standing for a Confucian virtue, rise into the sky. Later one each of the eight beads is found in the hands of infant sons born to men whose surnames begin with the character for dog inu . The eight young warriors or dogs (of the title) engage in various heroic exploits, alone or together, and eventually restore the Satomi family to power. The numerous volumes brought out by several succeeding publishers include illustrations by five ukiyo-e artists including Keisai Eisen k։p (1790-1848). From the early 1830's, single-sheet prints often in a series of Hakkenden were produced by such artists as Utagawa Kuniyoshi ̐썑F (1797-1861) and Kunisada (1786-1865). Most notably, a dramatic episode where Inuzuka Shino ːMT and Inukai Genpachi fight on the roof of the Houryuukaku Ft was often illustrated.
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