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daimyou teien@喼뉀
KEY WORD :@architecture / general terms
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Lit. daimyou garden. The Edo period stroll style *kaiyuushiki teien V뉀 gardens built by feudal lords (daimyou either in Edo or in their provincial castle towns joukamachi 鉺. The relative peace and prosperity of the Edo period combined with competition among daimyou and their desire to legitimize their power through cultural patronage led to the creation of these large and lavishly appointed gardens. In the manner of aristocratic retreats such as Katsura Rikyuu j{ and Shugakuin Rikyuu Cw@{ almost all daimyou teien include large ponds (see *chisen kaiyuushiki teien rV뉀) around which are arranged artificial hills as well a number of pavilions. A tea house *chashitsu and garden (*roji IH or *chaniwa ) are usually included. Typically these daimyou gardens make extensive use of *shukukei ki, famous scenic spots from China and Japan reproduced in miniature form. The literary and historical references inherent in shukkei signal the daimyou's cultural sophistication even as the multiple scenes in most shukkei provide an ordering principle which helps move the viewer through the garden. Daimyou teien make use of a number of old gardening techniques in addition to elements such as rice paddies, fruit orchards and herb gardens as well as enormous rolling lawns. Because provincial daimyou gardens were built adjacent to castles, the hydraulic and horticultural features of the garden often served practical functions. Notable daimyou teien in Tokyo include Koishikawa Kourakuen ΐy, Rikugien Z`, and Hama Rikyuu l{; other well known gardens are Kenrokuen Z in Ishikawa prefecture, Kourakuen y in Okayama prefecture, Ritsurin Kouen Iь in Ehime prefecture, Kairakuen y in Ibaraki prefecture, Suizenji O Seishuen  in Kumamoto prefecture, and Genkyuuen { in Shiga prefecture.
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