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bugakuryuu teien@w뉀
KEY WORD :@architecture / gardens
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Lit. garden of the Bugaku lineage. A style of Japanese garden developed in the middle of the Edo period by Ooishi Bugaku Εw (dates unknown), a gardener from Edo who moved to Mutsu province in Aomori prefecture to serve the Tsugaru Ìy clan. The style mixes conservative elements of 16-17c gardens, as faithfully preserved in the garden manual *TSUKIYAMA TEIZOUDEN zR둢` published in 1735 (Kyouhou 20), with an emphasis on the spirit of Shinto. One new feature of the Bugaku lineage garden, which is thought to indicate an interest in Shinto is the emphasis on the large flat stone commonly called the raihaiseki q in earlier gardens, but here called shinpaiseki _q (see *haiseki q). An important figure in the development of the Bugaku lineage gardens is Takayama Teizan (dates unknown), who was dispatched by the Tsugaru clan to Kyoto to study landscape design. His disciples included Kowata Teiju and Ikeda Teigetsu rc. Good examples of bugakuryuu include the late 19c Kiyofuji residence by Nomoto Douen { in Ogamichou 㒬, Minami-Tsugaru Ìy; the 1896 Katou residence by Kowata Teiju in Kuroishi City; and the early 20c Hasegawa J residence in Namiokachou Q, Minami-Tsugaru. Popular with samurai, as well as with wealthy merchants and even farmers, the style eventually spread along the Japan Sea Coast. Related styles of garden design developed in Hida Takayama ˍR (Gifu prefecture), Buzen Hikosan LOpFR (Fukuoka prefecture), Satsuma Chiran Fm (Kagoshima prefecture), and on Ishigaki Ί_ Island (Okinawa prefecture).
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